Mayor proclaims Fire Prevention Week in NC Oct. 3 to 9

Julie Davis
Nebraska City News-Press

“Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety” is the theme of the 2021 Fire Prevention Week, which will be observed in Nebraska City from Oct. 3 to 9.

Mayor Bryan Bequette proclaimed the week’s observance during the Sept. 20 Nebraska City City Council meeting. Nebraska City Fire Chief Rob Schreiner joined Bequette in making the proclamation.

This year’s theme is aimed at having people learn the sounds made by smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms. Families are encouraged to have and practice home safety plans that will ensure they can exit their homes safely in the event of an emergency.

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), home fires killed more than 2,700 peopl in the United States in 2019, and U.S. fire departments responded to 339,500 home fires across the country.

According to the latest NFPA “Smoke Alarms in the U.S.” report, working smoke alarms in the home reduce the risk of dying in a reported fire by more than half. However, almost three out of five home fire deaths occur in homes with no smoke alarms (41 percent) or smoke alarms that failed to operate (16 percent); missing or non-functional power sources, including missing or disconnected batteries, dead batteries, and disconnected hardwired alarms or other AC power issues, are the most common factors when smoke alarms fail to operate.

The NFPA offers these tips (and reminder sentences) for knowing what the sounds smoke and carbon monoxide alarms mean:

Smoke Alarms (Hear a beep. Get on your feet.)

A continued set of three loud beeps—beep, beep, beep—means smoke or fire. Get out, call 9-1-1, and stay out.

A single “chirp” every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed.

All smoke alarms must be replaced after 10 years.

Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced.

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Alarms (Hear a chirp. Make a change.)

A continuous set of four loud beeps—beep, beep, beep, beep—means carbon monoxide is present in your home. Go outside, call 9-1-1 and stay out.

A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be replaced.

CO alarms also have “end of life” sounds that vary by manufacturer. This means it’s time to get a new CO alarm.

Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced.

Fire Prevention Week