Nebraska City - Signature quilts and their stories will be the focus of February's Heritage Needlework Guild meeting.
During the Feb. 24 meeting of the Heritage Needlework Guild in Nebraska City, qualified quilt appraiser Gloria Hall of Palmyra will tell the stories behind historic signature quilts from her collection and several others loaned to her by their owners.

Nebraska City - Signature quilts and their stories will be the focus of February’s Heritage Needlework Guild meeting.
During the Feb.  24 meeting of the Heritage Needlework Guild in Nebraska City, qualified quilt appraiser Gloria Hall of Palmyra will tell the stories behind historic signature quilts from her collection and several others loaned to her by their owners.
Heritage Needlework Guild meetings are held on the fourth Tuesday of the month at First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 315 S. 16th St., in Nebraska City.  Meetings begin at 6:30 p.m. with a social time, with the program beginning at 7 p.m.
Guild meetings are open to anyone who is interested in joining.
The guild is not limited to those interested in quilting, all forms of needlework are included.
For generations, groups of quilters have commemorated special occasions by assembling blocks embroidered with the signatures of friends, family members, community leaders and neighbors. Many were made as fund raisers for clubs and community projects.
“It’s been sitting under my nose for the past 10 or 15 years,” Hall said.  “I have ten or 11 signature quilts from all over and they’re for all reasons.”
 Her oldest signature quilt is a green and yellow Amish  wedding quilt made in Lancaster County, Pa., in 1829. It includes the couple’s names and wedding date embroidered among the quilting.
Friends have loaned her an anniversary quilt and a quilt made in 1930 when its recipient graduated from high school in Syracuse.