Trump rhetoric makes many pause before crossing border; 24,000 safety defects found, Par 3 Contest tees off, and more headlines to start your day Wednesday, April 5, 2017.

IMMIGRANTS MORE HESITANT TO COME TO US UNDER TRUMP

 

MCALLEN, Texas — Just five people were eating dinner on a recent weeknight at a Texas church that is a stopping point for newly arrived immigrants on the U.S.-Mexico border. On a typical night last year, hundreds of immigrants might come through the church.

 

Immigrants who are still coming say many people in their home countries are staying home amid fears about President Donald Trump's immigration rhetoric, putting off coming to the U.S. until they see how his policies play out.

 

"There are mothers who heard that Trump might change the law to remove parents and keep the children here," said Jose Gonzalez, a 29-year-old father of two from El Salvador. "That stopped a lot of people."

 

 

THOUSANDS OF DEFECTS FOUND ON OIL TRAIN ROUTES

 

BILLINGS, Mont. — Government inspections of railroads that haul volatile crude oil across the United States have uncovered almost 24,000 safety defects, including problems similar to those blamed in derailments that triggered massive fires or oil spills in Oregon, Virginia, Montana and elsewhere, according to data obtained by The Associated Press.

 

The safety defects were discovered during targeted federal inspections on almost 58,000 miles of oil train routes in 44 states. The inspection program began two years ago following a string of oil train accidents across North America, including a 2013 derailment in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, that killed 47 people.

 

 

PAR 3 TEES OFF IN AUGUSTA

 

The traditional Par 3 Contest at the Masters will tee off at noon Eastern, a family-oriented good time before the stress of the season’s first major.

 

Live coverage of the event begins at 3 p.m. on ESPN. The Masters begins at 8 a.m. Eastern on Thursday.

 

 

FERGUSON VOTERS RE-ELECT MAYOR, ADOPT BODY CAMERA RULES

 

FERGUSON, Mo. — James Knowles III, the mayor who was the public face of Ferguson after Michael Brown's death in August 2014, held off a challenge from city Councilwoman Ella Jones, who was seeking to become the St. Louis suburb's first-ever black mayor. Knowles won with 56 percent of the vote. It will be Knowles' final term in office, due to term limits.

 

Ferguson voters also approved a ballot measure adding strict police body camera requirements to the city charter. Officers already use cameras, but the new policy will require them to be on virtually all the time and seeks to make footage more accessible to the public.

 

 

COURT RULES CIVIL RIGHTS ACT PROTECTS LGBT WORKERS

 

CHICAGO — A federal appeals court ruled for the first time Tuesday that the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBT employees from workplace discrimination, setting up a likely battle before the Supreme Court as gay rights advocates push to broaden the scope of the 53-year-old law.

 

The 8-to-3 decision by the full 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago comes just three weeks after a three-judge panel in Atlanta ruled the opposite, saying employers aren't prohibited from discriminating against employees based on sexual orientation.

 

The 7th Circuit is considered relatively conservative and five of the eight judges in the majority were appointed by Republican presidents, making the finding all the more notable.