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Nebraska City News-Press - Nebraska City, NE
  • McLeay Wants to Bring GMOs to Public's Attention

  • With the primary election just around the corner, on May 13, candidates are making the final push of in their campaigns.
    Bart McLeay, who is seeking the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, sat down with the News-Press to discuss why he believes he's the best candidate to replace the retiring Mike Johanns.
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  • With the primary election just around the corner, on May 13, candidates are making the final push of in their campaigns.
    Bart McLeay, who is seeking the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate, sat down with the News-Press to discuss why he believes he’s the best candidate to replace the retiring Mike Johanns.
    The Nebraska Senate race has drawn the attention of political junkies across the country.
    Political reporting websites such as the Hill and Watchdog.org and national newspapers such as the Washington Post have taken an interest in the race due, in part, to the amount of outside money being thrown into the race.
    McLeay noted that a reporter from the Wall Street Journal had approached him regarding the issue.  
    “It is discouraging that there are groups in Washington, D.C., particularly, that would have such influence in decision making by Nebraskans through media buys,” said McLeay. “I support free speech but we have to be concerned about special interest groups hijacking our elections here in Nebraska. I’ve run a clean campaign and 80 percent of the money I’ve received has come from Nebraskans.”
    McLeay said that he was not raising money through the use of Super PACs or special interests.
    “I’m raising funds through my own sources,” said McLeay. “I’m talking to small and big businesses. Farmers, ranchers and ordinary folks thoughout the state of Nebraska. That’s who’s supporting my campaign.”
    McLeay said that the biggest issue he talks about with voters is the size of the federal government.
    “There is a strong belief, throughout the state of Nebraska, that the federal government should maintain limited powers,” said McLeay. “There are symptoms of that problem. Obamacare is a symptom of that problem. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is a symptom. All of these agencies placing rules on Nebraskans is offensive.”
    McLeay said that he believed the EPA has taken its oversight to an “absurd and illogical conclusion.”
    “The EPA has created additional authority for itself,” said McLeay. “They are attempting to include every farm pond or every ditch that fills with water as navigable waters.” 
    McLeay said he’s hoping to raise awareness to the attacks faced by genetically modified organisms (GMOs).
    GMOs are used throughout the country by farmers to help increase crop production. Many are designed to be able to better stand up to pesticides and herbicides.
    While GMOs have been controversial from the beginning, the first crops began being used in 1996.
    Critics wish to see food made with GMOs labeled and say that there could be risks to people in the long run.  
    Page 2 of 2 - “I’ve been talking loudly about GMOs for several months because I have a very big concern about it,” said McLeay. “This could be the next ‘pink slime’ if Nebraska farmers don’t take immediate action to correct this misconception. It may have an unfortunate name, but just like pink slime, there is no harm that can be caused by GMOs.”
    McLeay says that the modified crops are critical to the agricultural community both in Nebraska and to the rest of America.
    “They give America the opportunity to feed the world,” said McLeay. “Without GMOs, we would not be able to mass produce at the level that we’re doing so. This is a big issue.”
     

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