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Nebraska City News-Press - Nebraska City, NE
  • Nebraska City announces "An Enchanted Arboretum" for public art project

  • Nebraska City's first public art project will feature trees constructed of metal and imagination.Arts Are Basic, a Doane College partner, is coordinating Nebraska City students and professional artists to create 24, six-foot tree sculptures. An additional 40 trees, made by Nebraska City students, will a...
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  • Nebraska City's first public art project will feature trees constructed of metal and imagination.
    Arts Are Basic, a Doane College partner, is coordinating Nebraska City students and professional artists to create 24, six-foot tree sculptures. An additional 40 trees, made by Nebraska City students, will appear in town to promote "Nebraska City, where great ideas grow."
    Rebecca Turner of Nebraska City Tourism and Commerce said public art projects across the country promote excitement, display artistic expression, build a feeling of community and support the arts.
    "Beginning in the spring of 2013, Nebraska City will sprout a new kind of forest," she said.
    Tom Farrell, a school board member and volunteer with the Arbor City Committee, said the concept of the tree is great fit for Nebraska City.
    Arts Are Basic teacher Liz Shea-McCoy is project coordinator.
    She will oversee community programming and work with students and teachers participating as artists.
    Shea-McCoy directed and was a participating artists in the Tour de Lincoln, which featured bicycles made of steel. Farrell said aluminum may be used for the Nebraska City projects.
    She is expected to make three classroom visits throughout the school year to support teachers and encourage students through the design process.
    The Arbor City committee selected the tree image created by Shea-McCoy.
     "I love public art projects and have seen, first hand, the many benefits they offer cities that have the energy
    and enthusiasm to take on such a magnificent, imaginative and resourceful undertaking," Shea-McCoy said.
    "A great deal has been accomplished in the planning; however, there is more work ahead as much of what is being accomplished is truly "a work in progress," she said.

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