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Nebraska City News-Press - Nebraska City, NE
  • Essency Records hopes to reconnect music lovers with vinyl albums

  • The Riverview Terrace Orchestra's is breaking new ground by returning to a traditional recording format, says Essency Records founder Curley Temple. The orchestra's album, Great Gospel Melodies, is recorded on clear vinyl in a 12-inch album heard on a 78 rpm  turntable. ...
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  • The Riverview Terrace Orchestra's is breaking new ground by returning to a traditional recording format, says Essency Records founder Curley Temple.
    The orchestra's album, Great Gospel Melodies, is recorded on clear vinyl in a 12-inch album heard on a 78 rpm  turntable.
    Temple said Essency Records offers music lovers a greater music experience on the longest-lasting format.
    "Vinyl is still alive.
    That's why you see popular events like 'record store day' in Omaha and new turntables showing up at retail stores.
    "The younger generation is discovering the intimacy of vinyl, how personal it is and how interactive it is to lay on the turntable and put a needle to it," he said.
    "They are learning that record playing is more than the music. It's the feel of the record, the look of it, the beauty of the label and the jacket art," he said.
    Essency's first record is a collection of traditional gospel tunes you might find in any church hymnal. The Riverview Terrace Orchestra is made up of a bass guitar, rhythm guitar and according. Musicians are Temple, Kathy Shank and Judy McConnaughey.
    In addition to the experience of vinyl records, Temple says it is the most enduring form for recording.
    "We're riding a crest of the new wave in vinyl," he said. "There's nothing to preserve the music better, not today's CDs and not even tape," he said.
    Temple still has the first record he ever purchased.
    He was at an consignment store with his father when a record in red vinyl caught his eye. It was a recording of Alfred Newman conducting the Hollywood Symphony and he purchased it for 24 cents.
    "It was my entire week's allowance at the time, but it was quarter well spent," he said.
    Temple said he has had been fascinated with vinyl records from an early age.
    "Making records has been a dream of mine since I was nine years old and, four years later, here it is. We finally got it done," he said.
    With the 200 copies of the first record on sale, Temple is working on the second issue.
    It's called "After Hours at Smokey Joes" by Curley Temple and the Velvet Jazz Ensemble.
    Temple said friends from an old group in Maine are performing.
     
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