In the winter of 2008 city officials happily announced a $500,000 grant to extend the pedestrian trail through Steinhart Park and replace the pedestrian bridge.



More than three years later the smiles were more out of frustration, as City Administrator Pat Haverty told the parks advisory board March 23 that the pedestrian bridge has been declared historic.



“The state has decided the current bridge is a historically significant structure, which creates for us a ton of problems,” Haverty said of the State Historical Preservation Office.


In the winter of 2008 city officials happily announced a $500,000 grant to extend the pedestrian trail through Steinhart Park and replace the pedestrian bridge.

More than three years later the smiles were more out of frustration, as City Administrator Pat Haverty told the parks advisory board March 23 that the pedestrian bridge has been declared historic.

“The state has decided the current bridge is a historically significant structure, which creates for us a ton of problems,” Haverty said of the State Historical Preservation Office.

Haverty said the city has been informed that only three bridges of that “architectural style” are remaining.

He said the state may decide the bridge, known as a Pawnee arch, is unsuable and allow the city to photograph and remove it.

In the worst-case scenario, he said, it will be left in place or the city will have to pick it up and offer it for use elsewhere.

“It could back up the project for another year,” he said, pushing the trail completion date to 2014.

If the bridge can be demolished, Haverty said the city could let the trail project for bids next spring.

The city budgeted $50,000 for the trail in 2009.
Haverty said the bridge was moved to its current location in the 1970s.