The $1.8 million Fourth Corso paving project scheduled July through October will cost some residents parking opportunities along the roadway.


  Olsson Associates representatives told 22 people meeting Tuesday at the Rowe Memorial Safety Complex that 2.2 miles of the street will be re-paved using federal incentive funds.


  City Administrator Pat Haverty said driveways will not be affected, but federal regulations do not allow parallel parking between the curb and sidewalk.


The $1.8 million Fourth Corso paving project scheduled July through October will cost some residents parking opportunities along the roadway.

Olsson Associates representatives told 22 people meeting Tuesday at the Rowe Memorial Safety Complex that 2.2 miles of the street will be re-paved using federal incentive funds.

City Administrator Pat Haverty said driveways will not be affected, but federal regulations do not allow parallel parking between the curb and sidewalk.

Tiffany Torres, who owns a house at 1311 Fourth Corso, says she would like to see a printed copy of the federal regulations.

“They have resurfaced that area before, so an overlay project should not affect parking,” she said.

She said she has paid nearly a $1,000 to level and rock a parking area in front of the residence and does not see an acceptable alternative.

She said there is no room for parking in back and no guarantee the alley will be maintained.

“The alley is in poor condition and almost unusable,” she said.

Haverty said the city welcomes an opportunity to meet with landowners like Torres to find parking solutions.

Michael Piernicky, Olsson's regional manager at the Omaha office, said the former state highway will be paved to state standards for a municipal street.

The project was initially planned for 2013, but was moved forward to take advantage of funds available through federal incentive programs.

Piernicky said the three-inch overlay will extend the life of the pavement from three to 10 years. The street light at 11th Street and Fourth Corso, constructed in 1968, will also be replaced.

He said obstacles in the road right-of-way will also be removed.

“There are a number of items privately placed on the public right-of-way,” Piernicky said.

He said the engineers will work with the U.S. Postal Service so there are no significant changes to how or where the mail is delivered.

Christopher Rolling of Olsson Associates said areas used for parallel parking will be planted to grass.

He said there may be some lanes closed during the construction, but the road will remain open to traffic. A flagger will direct traffic during paving.