There’s no doubt that gas prices are on the rise. Conserve a bit with our suggested

methods and reap big savings at the pump over time.

There’s no doubt that gas prices are on the rise. Conserve a bit with our suggested
methods and reap big savings at the pump over time.

Consider engine size
Mechanic Ethan Fuller of Fuller’s Service Center in Hinsdale, Ill., a suburb of Chicago, suggests considering engine size when you’re looking to save on gas. “Small engines burn less gas,” says Fuller. “But keep in mind there’s no magic trick that’s going to help you save. It’s mostly common sense.” If you’re in the market for a new vehicle but are concerned about fuel use and expense, opt for a smaller engine.

Drive smart
How you drive can largely affect on how fast a tank of gas is used, Fuller says. “The way that you accelerate from a stop makes a big difference; don’t hit the gas hard,” he says. “Also, starting your car takes a lot of gas. The more often you do it, the more gas you’ll use.” Try accelerating slowly, and plan for infrequent starts and stops whenever possible.

Shop before you spend
Take a moment to search your ZIP code at www.gasbuddy.com to locate the best fuel deal nearby. You’ll be surprised — prices can vary as much as 20 cents a gallon in a two-mile radius. For a 20-gallon tank, a few clicks can result in a $4 savings. For folks who fill up once a week, that’s $208 saved over a year.

Maintenance is key
“The best thing you can do for your gas mileage is to keep your car in top working order,” says Fuller, who says many people will continue to drive with illuminated warning lights, such as the “check engine” indicator. “This is a sign that something is wrong and you’re likely burning more gas than necessary.” The check-engine light,
as well as other warnings, can refer to an array of maintenance issues and should be attended to as soon as
possible.

Constant speeds save
Fuller says that highway driving is easiest on a vehicle, and your car will reward you with less consumed gas when you do it. “Around-town driving is tough; there’s not much you can do,” Fuller says. “You’re always going to burn more gas this way.”